Japanese cooking

Making fast miso soup in the morning

Recently, I found I am sometimes a little too sensitive to coffee in the early morning. Too much caffeine too early seems to be a shock for my stomach, and can cause stomach irritation for me.

 

When I stayed in Kyoto this autumn, I learned the Japanese habit of waking up to have a nice cup of miso soup first thing, instead of coffee. Maybe it's a way of gently restarting your deeply relaxed body after a night of resting.

 

In Taiqi-influenced cooking and eating, we think it's better to start the day with a warm drink. Miso soup is a fermented lactobacillus drink. It improves the digestion, absorption of nutrients, and warms the body. Drinking miso soup is a good start to the morning, and like Taiqi, I think it balances the yin and yang energy of the body

 

Japanese homecooking class in Tokyo

My friend in Tokyo, Japan, Tsukako Imura, is a very good teacher of Japanese cuisine. 

The pictures on this page show her cooking

Ms. Imura and Ms. Mizuno taught me many of the basics of Japanese home cooking. I learned about key Japanese ingredients and how to use them; how to prepare classic Japanese homestyle dishes like gyudon, rolled sushi, grilled rice balls, and miso soup; and even some important Japanese cutting techniques! Together, we created many delicious and healthy meals, and we had a great time doing it.

Lesson Overview 

☆ Cooking Lessons

1. Tofu cooking (Two kinds of Tohu dishes, one side dish, Miso soup and rice) 6500 JPY

2. Tonkatsu (japanese pork cutlet) cooking (Tonkatsu and Rolled Tonkatsu, salad, Miso soup and rice) 8000 JPY
Syndicate content